MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel MinMaxTravel
Home | Malaysia | Maylaysia Overview | Culture
Culture

Cultures have been meeting and mixing in Malaysia since the very beginning of its history. More than fifteen hundred years ago a Malay kingdom in Bujang Valley welcomed traders from China and India. With the arrival of gold and silks, Buddhism and Hinduism also came to Malaysia. A thousand years later, Arab traders arrived in Malacca and brought with them the principles and practices of Islam. By the time the Portuguese arrived in Malaysia, the empire that they encountered was more cosmopolitan than their own.  

Malaysia's cultural mosaic is marked by many different cultures, but several in particular have had especially lasting influence on the country. Chief among these is the ancient Malay culture, and the cultures of Malaysia's two most prominent trading partners throughout history--the Chinese, and the Indians. These three groups are joined by a dizzying array of indigenous tribes, many of which live in the forests and coastal areas of Borneo. Although each of these cultures has vigorously maintained its traditions and community structures, they have also blended together to create contemporary Malaysia's uniquely diverse heritage.  

One example of the complexity with which Malaysia's immigrant populations have contributed to the nation's culture as a whole is the history of Chinese immigrants. The first Chinese to settle in the straits, primarily in and around Malacca, gradually adopted elements of Malaysian culture and intermarried with the Malaysian community. Known as babas and nonyas, they eventually produced a synthetic set of practices, beliefs, and arts, combining Malay and Chinese traditions in such a way as to create a new culture. Later Chinese, coming to exploit the tin and rubber booms, have preserved their culture much more meticulously. A city like Penang, for example, can often give one the impression of being in China rather than in Malaysia.  

Another example of Malaysia's extraordinary cultural exchange the Malay wedding ceremony, which incorporates elements of the Hindu traditions of southern India; the bride and groom dress in gorgeous brocades, sit in state, and feed each other yellow rice with hands painted with henna. Muslims have adapted the Chinese custom of giving little red packets of money (ang pau) at festivals to their own needs; the packets given on Muslim holidays are green and have Arab writing on them.

You can go from a Malaysian kampung to a rubber plantation worked by Indians to Penang's Chinese kongsi and feel you've traveled through three nations. But in cities like Kuala Lumpur, you'll find everyone in a grand melange. In one house, a Chinese opera will be playing on the radio; in another they're preparing for Muslim prayers; in the next, the daughter of the household readies herself for classical Indian dance lessons.

Perhaps the easiest way to begin to understand the highly complex cultural interaction which is Malaysia is to look at the open door policy maintained during religious festivals. Although Malaysia's different cultural traditions are frequently maintained by seemingly self-contained ethnic communities, all of Malaysia's communities open their doors to members of other cultures during a religious festival--to tourists as well as neighbors. Such inclusiveness is more than just a way to break down cultural barriers and foster understanding. It is a positive celebration of a tradition of tolerance that has for millennia formed the basis of Malaysia's progress.  

  • Malaysia (West and East Malaysia) land area is roughly 328,550 sq km (about half size of Thailand). It lies at 7° north of the Equator. Thailand borders...
  • Malaysia's position in the equatorial zone guarantees a classic tropical climate with relative humidity levels usually around 90%. Weather is fairly hot...
  • The ancestors of the people that now inhabit the Malaysian peninsula first migrated to the area between 2500 and 1500 B.C. Those living in the coastal...
  • High-frequency data indicate a worsening global economic outlook.In June, both global manufacturing and services were down, as indicated by the JPMorgan...
  • Cultures have been meeting and mixing in Malaysia since the very beginning of its history. More than fifteen hundred years ago a Malay kingdom in Bujang...
  • Malaysia is a country that is known for its rich and cultural heritage. Here, people strongly believe in respecting each other's culture and religion....
  • Anyone visiting Malaysia for the first time would not cease to be amazed by the number of festivals and events that are happening the whole year around....

MinMax Travel © 2002 - 2017. All copyrights reserved. International Travel License 01-240/2010/TCDL-GPL HQT.

Head Office: 15 An Duong Vuong, Tay Ho District, Hanoi City, Vietnam Tele: +84 (04) 37101308 Fax +84 (04) 37101307 Email: vietnam@minmaxtravel.com
Ho Chi Minh City Office: 1F, 179 Nguyen Cu Trinh, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Tele +84 976934428 Email: vietnam@minmaxtravel.com

VIETNAM: +84 4 37101308 HOTLINE: +84 (0) 976 118 989

Vietiso

LiveZilla Live Chat Software